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Fiction: Every Valley Wide

Some things, when you didn’t understand them, you didn’t try to figure them out. Sometimes you just didn’t want to know.

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Piles of Time. Yasu Matsumoto

These works are the expression of such unusual phenomena that I think is created by the everlasting accumulation, or piles of time that are embedded in the process of forest growing.

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Eris and her Apples of Discord

If you ignore these apples, they’re small and harmless. But the more attention you pay them, the more you try to get rid of them, the larger they get, until they block your way entirely, or destroy you.

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American Mythologies: Get a Real Job

It strikes me as funny that many of the laborers in our workforce don’t actually get to call labor day a holiday. It’s part of our complicated history of attitudes about work, about people who work, and about the jobs they do.

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September Issue

A collection of all the articles we’ve published over the past month, for those who like to savor their Magpies’ tidings as an issue.

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Tom Titanic, A Cautionary Tale

Both living on their nerves, growing thinner as Tom grew fatter, they refused follow-up visits from the authorities. She missed her post-natal check-up, and they did not attend the vaccination clinic. The authorities became concerned.

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Rag and Bone

He hasn’t lost the love or the language, he’s just brought them down to earth. He’s using them to make the ordinary beautiful–rags, bones, broken bottles. And things as extraordinarily ordinary as aging, as remembering.

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An Interview with Liz Johnson

“I like to introduce something remarkable into ordinary,  everyday circumstances because I think that there are always interesting things happening all  around us––and sometimes some very surreal things.”

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Fiction: The Fallen Fighter

All night long they clung to each other, bobbing on a sea of whisky and memories and dreams, lashed to a floating spar that sank and rose and sank and rose again.

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August Issue

A collection of all the articles we’ve published over the past month, for those who like to savor their Magpies’ tidings as an issue.

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Auto Anthropology

“I know that part of my attraction to a lone old car on some quiet urban street or sitting out in the desert is because it plays into a fantasy of a time after the car.”

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Linden Tea Madeleines

But this magical madeleine and tea, which he accepts while full of adult cares and woes, brings him such joy that he no longer feels mediocre, accidental, mortal, which is what being an adult feels like, on a bad day. 

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American mythologies: Everybody in Khakis

Of course the truth is that despite the fact that advertising agencies are shaming us into looking alike on the outside and conservative politicians are trying to make sure we’re all the same race and religion, despite the fact that we haven’t always had the highest tolerance for difference, America has a splendid history of eccentrics, some celebrated, some obscure and forgotten.

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Featured Artist: Lauren Mary Barnett

“Even if it’s just the way the light is hitting a glass or a strange assortment of items on a table or power lines swooped in front of a house. And really these moments of beauty can be fleeting so it feels nice to capture them somehow. “

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La Noire de…

She doesn’t have a voice in their presence. What we get instead is the rich, intelligent voice of her thoughts and her memories.

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Wormley Hughes

The man who dug Jefferson’s grave was named Wormley Hughes. He was the principal gardener at Monticello. The garden at Monticello is a true thing of wonder. Beautiful, useful, inspiring – a perfect spot to sit and ponder questions of liberty and independence. Wormley Hughes was informally (not legally) freed after Jefferson’s death (famously, on July 4th), and shortly thereafter, Hughes’ wife and 8 of his children were divided and sold away from each other.

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July Issue

A collection of all the articles we’ve published over the past month, for those who like to savor their Magpies’ tidings as an issue.

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Letter From the Editor July: Words and Silence

It seems more important now than ever to tell our stories and share our stories, and listen to the stories of others. To amplify the voices of anybody struggling to be heard, and to celebrate when the words or images or silences speak to us or bewilder us or transform us. To harness our anger or sadness or joy in a wild productive fury, resonating with the strange perfect words we make our own or the deafening silences we inhabit.

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Fiction: Profile

“The suburban kids are the worst.” Joe Bird stands with his hands on his hips, disconcertingly unperturbed by the repeated crashing behind him. “Kids” aged roughly 12 to 18 years, of both sexes, throw themselves violently into a chain link fence.

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